A Foot in the Door

Olivia Scott finished her MA in early September 2016. Since then she’s spent 4 weeks as a location runner in Ibiza (yes, really!) and is about to commence her second paid TV role as a casting runner in London. Here’s how FTV helped her to get that foot in the door…

oliviaIt seems like only yesterday that I got my acceptance onto the MA in Film and Television: Research and Production at the University of Birmingham. Doing my undergrad (History) at UoB, it felt only natural for me to stay an extra year, on this fantastic course, as I loved the uni, and the opportunities the course could provide me, so much. In all honesty, my main reason for undertaking the MA was the placement aspect of the course, as I, like many other rookies looking to get a career in television or film, didn’t know where to start. I thought that the course would provide me with the necessary skills and training which would stand me in good stead to get a job in the television industry. And I was right.

I enjoyed every aspect of the MA, from practical training with Oz, to documentary filmmaking with Richard. However, my favourite taught module was Research, Production and Commissioning with Kate Hollingsworth (who works in television). As a self-confessed TV obsessive, I loved learning about every aspect of the television industry, and Kate was an inspirational teacher. This module, as well as the placements I undertook, reinforced that I definitely wanted to pursue a career in television.

However, it was definitely the placement aspect of the course which I feel I thrived in. I was a casting runner at 7Wonder in Birmingham for two months, working on a cookery show for Channel 4. I really felt like a part of the team and I learned loads about the TV industry and casting itself. This experience led me to get the job that I am currently working in, as a casting runner for a company in London, called Nutopia. To get the chance to actually work for a television company was amazing, and I learned some invaluable skills, all thanks to the MA.

olivia-ibiza

The MA also helped me get my first job in television: being a location runner on Ibiza Weekender (ITV2). To have the chance to go abroad for a month was amazing, let alone getting the chance to go to Ibiza for a month! I had to give my dissertation in 3 weeks early, and my placement essay 2 weeks early (a day before I flew out to Ibiza) but it was worth it, as working on Ibiza Weekender was an amazing experience, and I learned so much about working on location and the necessary tasks that are involved in being a location runner. It was relentless hard work, but again I feel that the experience I had on the MA really helped me to do my best at the job. It also helped that I had watched the show so knew the format!

I can’t thank Richard, Jemma and Oz enough. Doing the MA was the best decision and all aspects of it have allowed me to get my foot in the door of the television industry, an industry I hope to work in for a number of years!

Olivia Scott

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Wilson’s Placement Trilogy

Wilson McCall hails from Philadelphia, USA and was enrolled on the MA from 2013 to 2014. As an international student, he was particularly keen to develop an understanding of how the British media industry works, and his placement time was effectively split between three different companies. Here’s his account of his experiences at Wall to Wall, Isis Media and the BBC.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESThe MA in Film and Television: Research and Production attracted me for a number of reasons. In particular, the industry placements offered valuable production experience, which was often hard to find in the USA. During my studies, I had the privilege of working at three excellent companies. Each placement taught me something new, honed my skills and widened my understanding of the industry.

Wall to Wall: On my first placement of the year, I joined Wall to Wall Media in London. They were in the midst of producing Child Genius for Channel 4 and I helped by transcribing interviews for the editors, making notes of any standout sentences or moments. This job allowed me to get a sense of each participant’s story and encouraged me to think from the editor’s perspective.

I then moved to the Research Department for Secrets from the Workhouse. There, I assisted the other researchers by utilising census databases and searching for useful historical details. I particularly loved working in this area, because I always learned something new and interesting about the past. I followed this up by annotating scripts for Drugs, Inc., verifying the accuracy of fact-based statements. During this time, I also took part in a game show run-through – a very interesting and fun experience!

I really enjoyed my time at Wall to Wall Media, and I came away from it with great appreciation for, and knowledge of, the work behind factual television programmes. 

Isis:  At Isis Media, I had the great opportunity to develop and pitch a programme for their consideration. In the process of preparing my concepts, I analysed the existing content of prospective channels and considered how to appeal to different demographics. I researched potential locations, organisations, participants and, with help, structured show ideas into returnable, international formats.

Besides working in development, I also assisted in the subtitling of corporate videos. This involved matching translations with timecodes and ensuring their correct entry into a provided template. After that, I researched for a project in development, sourcing potential locations and hosts.

The team at Isis Media was truly wonderful. They always encouraged and engaged with new ideas, offering valuable advice, insight and an environment open for creative discussion.

BBC: My final placement was at the BBC Drama Village in Selly Oak, experiencing Doctors from pre-production to the editing suites. I started in the Research Department, reviewing scripts for factual details in need of advisement. I then moved to the Script Editing room where I wrote script synopses and witnessed how a story develops from idea to production-ready draft.

From there, I moved to the Locations Department and learned about the process and considerations involved in selecting new locations. I also worked as a runner on set, assisting the actors and crew, and observing their craft. Finally, I moved to the post-production suites and, there, I saw the dubbing and audio mixer, colour grader and visual editor complete the story.

Working at the BBC was a fascinating experience. In particular, I found it extremely important to see how each department interacts and contributes to the finished episode.

New Start: With experience in both factual television and drama, I feel confident in my skills and prepared for future work. My understanding of the UK television and film industry will also give me an edge when applying for jobs in the States. These placements have been invaluable in contributing to the growth of my career, and I am grateful that I got to work with and learn from such talented people.

Wilson McCall

One Year On From FTV

In this guest blog, Scott Billing talks about what he’s been working on in the year since he finished his MA, offering some words of wisdom along the way…

Scott for blogAfter completing the placement module of the FTV course at Maverick Television in Birmingham I was asked to do a further four weeks work, which was mainly sourcing images for the Film4 website at the Maverick office in London. This meant slightly extending the deadline for my 30 minute documentary, and also some quite long hours of vast excel spreadsheet work. At the time I was delighted, as we all know that paid work is extremely difficult to come by.  

I suppose I made a fairly good impression as a few weeks later, in fact the day after completing the FTV course, I was asked to interview for a Junior Researcher position at Maverick London. I was offered the job and since then I have been working as a part of the award-winning multiplatform department, where we are producing three original content YouTube channels*. 

Due to having a relatively small team my role has been extremely diverse and I have been lucky enough to not only research, but to also occasionally shoot and edit some of our content. My day-to-day duties include maintaining camera kit, data wrangling, moving set and props to locations, lighting, research and the odd bit of casting (you’ll be glad to know these are things that can evidently be picked up along the way). My contract finishes this September and I am somehow both anxious and excited about my next challenge. Until then I am trying to absorb as much knowledge and make as many friends and contacts as possible.  

In my limited experience I have this advice to share. If you have an opportunity in TV, Film or the media then seize it with both hands. Always ask senior members of the team what you can be doing, be enthusiastic, never exhale heavily (or show any other signs of displeasure) if you are asked to do something tedious or unpleasant, be punctual, be organised and make lots of tea (SERIOUSLY, this is not a joke, even if you don’t drink tea. It’s the best way to meet people in the kitchen and it impresses those you work with). That’s it.  

*If you’d like to check out the YouTube channels they are called ‘Daily Mix TV’ and ‘Bodytalk Daily’. I have also done some work for ‘The You Generation’ which is the new talent search channel produced by Maverick in partnership with Syco, Simon Cowell’s production company.

Scott Billing