Don’t take a job, make a job

On Friday 9th June, we welcomed James Cronin and Joe Partridge from Project Birmingham to campus to talk to our MA students about freelancing in the creative industries.  The interactive workshop covered James and Joe’s own career journeys to date and was designed to help students identify their objectives and aspirations in relation to personal skillsets, with a key focus on film, media and creating opportunities in the city of Birmingham.

Project Birmingham was founded by James in 2015. It aims to bring together the creative community in Birmingham and generate a buzz around the city’s culture and talented individuals. In addition to Project Birmingham, both he and Joe have ‘day jobs’ and additional interests they pursue outside of their careers. As they noted at the start of the workshop ‘it’s not about what you do, but why you do it’, which is an important question for anyone to consider as they prepare to leave university and commence working life.P1000011.JPG

Key themes of the session were the importance of having passion and pride in your work and recognising personal strengths and weaknesses – after all, if you’re an aspiring freelancer then the drive to succeed should ideally be rooted in a genuine love for what you want to do. Students were encouraged to think about the skills they might need to put a plan for their future goals into action: while some of us have no qualms about picking up a camera and setting up shoots, for example, others are far more comfortable dealing with business admin and social media. Going solo is a great aspiration, but having an awareness of where our individual limitations lie is just as important as exercising our strengths effectively. As James advised, ‘think about what you can do better than anyone else in the world’ and then research where (or for whom) you can add that value.

‘Focussing on strengths and weaknesses and setting a goal was a really useful exercise’ (James Cresswell)

Many people assume that pursuing a career in film and TV necessitates moving to London, but James and Joe reinforced the fact that Birmingham is also an excellent city in which to forge a creative career. As the broad film and media sectors continue to collide, being in a smaller pool where the pace is a touch slower can be beneficial to recent graduates. Nobody is pretending that it’s not still a competitive industry, but there are strong networks to tap into in Birmingham and dozens of stories waiting to be told through various art forms. Hopefully this session motivated our FTV students to go out and tell them!

‘I really enjoyed the interactive elements of the session, which made it stand out from other talks’ (Malcolm Remedios)

With myth busting and practical advice about tax and self-employment also being covered, the workshop was a fantastic opportunity for our MA cohort to think about what their next steps might be after September. As part-time student Jessica Brown commented, ‘It was cool to hear their stories and to be presented with the option of moving between different roles as we start our careers. ’ Both Joe and James demonstrated that a career doesn’t need be limited to one area or indeed one role as this chapter of education ends. As they rightly said, advice is useful, but ultimately it’s up to us to make jobs, and not just take jobs.

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Jemma Saunders, Placement Coordinator

This workshop was kindly supported by the Curriculum Enhancement Fund.

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Baking a Perfect CV

Think of the Great British Bake Off and the care and attention each contestant puts into their signature bakes. Visualise the beautiful cakes they present to the judges and how these demonstrate their skillset and meet the weekly brief, from creating the perfect blend of flavours to showcasing a flair for presentation through icing, tempered chocolate or spun sugar. Now picture a CV.

To my mind, crafting a cake for Mary Berry’s discerning gaze and taste buds is similar to drafting a CV for a prospective employer.  Let’s start with you: just as the Bake Off judges want to know what they’re about to sample, an employer needs to know whose CV they’re going to read. This starts with an appropriate file name for your document (you wouldn’t provide a blank label, or just write ‘Cake’ at a village fair would you?) and also displaying your name clearly at the top.

2-chocolate-cake-on-plateNext up is the aesthetic appeal and content of your baked goods. A mirror glaze cake is expected to have a smooth and shiny surface, and a CV must clearly reflect you. As Donkey once said to Shrek, ‘Cakes have layers’ and so do CVs: clearly defined sections that are perfectly formatted to help build the pleasing whole. Whether you have a technical skills and training section at the top (perfectly iced flowers adorning the cake) or showcase your capabilities through examples in other sections (a talent for blending flavourful butter cream fillings), you construct a CV to be as enticing as possible for the target reader.

This leads me to what I think of as the ‘format vomit’: just as bakers have come under fire for lurid icing colour combinations and adventurous decoration, throwing everything Microsoft Word has to offer at your CV is not necessarily a good idea. Neatly headed and structured sections do not always need further embellishment with bold, italics, different fonts and underlining – it would be akin to topping a Jaffa Cake with cherries, peanuts, silver balls and caramel sauce simultaneously.

(I hear some of you cry, ‘what’s wrong with that?’ and my answer is ‘how do you know where to start?’. If faced with an over-formatted CV, the initial impression could be distracting and potentially put off an employer).

Mary and Paul also want to see their briefs met and that promises are delivered upon. Think of the mammoth bread cornucopia in last year’s series: there was almost too much to consider and a more selective approach may have worked in the baker’s favour. Providing an appropriate level of detail and relevant experience on your CV (the correct ingredients to suit the employer’s dietary requirements, if you will) shows that you understand the role you’re applying for.  On a similar note, there’s no point in adding additional detail purely because you think it’ll make you seem a better candidate, especially if it’s not true – after all, if a cupcake promises lavender flavour then doesn’t deliver when the customer takes a chance and tucks in, there’s inevitably disappointment.

No Bake Off analogy would be complete without reference to a soggy bottom, and thus we come to references. Rounding off your CV with details of people who are happy to be contacted about you provides a solid foundation to support all the work you’ve put in above.

So when you’re next revising your CV for an application, consider the efforts you’d put into a show-stopping cake to win the role. Construct your layers, showcase your skills, make sure it’s neatly finished, and allow plenty of time to get it right: after all, no employer wants something half-baked.

Jemma Saunders

This post was first published by Jemma on LinkedIn, 1st September 2016.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/baking-perfect-cv-jemma-saunders?trk=prof-post

2015 Round Up

The Christmas break is upon us once more, and it’s been another full and exciting year for the MA in Film and Television: Research and Production.

We kicked off 2015 with the Department of Film & Creative Writing’s first ever One Minute Movie Competition, which is being revived again for 2016 with a theme of ‘Memory and Forgetting’. Easter saw a trip to Bristol for a recording of ‘Deal or No Deal’ and between January and August our students undertook placements at twenty-four different production companies, five of which were new partners for the MA.

Over the summer three FTV students worked with MA convenor Richard Langley to produce a short film for Age Concern Birmingham, which is now featured on their YouTube channel.

In mid-September we bade farewell to our 2014-15 cohort, who formally graduated last week. Many have already enjoyed paid roles in industry at organisations including Fremantle Media and Al Jazeera, and it’s been great to hear of other alumni successes throughout the year.

We welcomed our new FTV students two weeks later, who have had a full term of seminars, screenings, training and guest speakers from industry. After Christmas they will start embarking on their placements and working towards their film assignments; a 3-5 minute guided editing project and a 25-minute documentary, which serves as their dissertation.

It will be full steam ahead again come January, but in the meantime thank you to everyone who has worked with us this year, and we wish all our students, alumni, placement partners and friends a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

FTV Christmas